Archives mensuelles : mai 2015

The father of the Haitian classical guitar

Eclectic guitarist Marc Ribot honors his mentor with Frantz Casseus Young Guitarists Program
by Patrick Moran (Classical Guitar Magazine, spring 2015)

Ribot Marc sur Frantz Casseus (Bomb 82)'“I didn’t want to be yet another outsider expressing ideas about what Haiti needs or should do,” Marc Ribot says.
The eclectif six-string veteran of New york’s downtown avant-garde and No Wave noise scenes is discussing his current project to aid the youth of Haiti, a country stille recovering from the ravages of the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that struck the island nation in 2010.
“Haiti’s not abundant in natural ressources, but it’s rich in its people and its culture,” Ribot says. “If you look at the countries where popular and traditional music hineave become huge exports – Brazil and Cuba come to mind – these are countries that have a strong classical conservatory. I believe the two are related.”
To foster Haiti’s recovery by encouraging the dissemination of its culture, Ribot founded the Frantz Casseus Young Guitarists Program in Port-au-Prince with the mission of provinding “a haven of creativity and stability to low-income students.” Named after Frantz Casseus, considered the father of Haitian classical guitar, the program, now in its third year, serves 30 students with weekly classes and quarterly recitals.

To understand how Ribot got involved in Haitian rebuilding efforts and in commemorating one country’s seminal guitarists, you have to go back to 1965, when an 11-year-old kid first decided he wantad to play rock’n’roll. “Frantz (Casseus) was a fmily friend,” Ribot recalls. “He used to play his guitar at get-togethers at my aunt and uncle’s house in New York city. It was the first live music I ever heard.”
Ribot, a suburban kid enthralled with the Rolling Stones, wanted to learn to play like Keith Richards. His family, who “didn’t distinguish much between rock’n’roll and classical music”, decided that Casseus was te man to train their son. Ribot remembers Casseus as a patient teacher. “He understood the needs of a kid who wanted to play what he heard on the radio and was not ready to make a commitment to mastering technique. He went light on technique, but he taught me a bunch of pieces, including a few o his own.”
Ribot didn’t know it then, but those pieces – Casseus’ compositions fused Haiti’s folkloric rhythms with the European classical tradition – were groundbreaking in their day.

Born in 1915 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Casseus was the son of an affluent civil servant. Yet he turned his back on a life of privilege, dropping out of law school to devote his life to guitar. Though Casseus soon established himself as a respected interpreter of traditional classical repertoire for Port-au-Prince’s cultural elite, his ambitions drew his attention to the Haitian countryside.
“Frantz’s insight was to use folk material as an inspiration to compose a distinctly Haitian classical-guitar music,” Ribot says. “This wasn’t a new concept – Bela bartok has used Hungarian folk themes as a catalyst and Heitor Villa-Lobos had done something similar. But it was a revolutionary move for a black classical composer, and entirely new for Haiti.”
American jazz also weaved it spell – the influence of Fats Waller »s stride piano jazz harmony is audible in Casseus work, Ribot says – so it was perhaps inevitable that the Haitian guitarist would emigrate to New York. In the mid-1950s, Casseus settled in the Upper West Side, where he recorded his masterpieces, for Folkways Records.
Byt the time Ribot took lessons from Casseus, the guitarist had already accompanied and toured the United States with Harry Belafonte and in 1956, had become the first black artist to play classicla guitar at Carnegie Hall.

Ribot stopped taking lessons from Casseus within a few years. Though they stayed in touch, their paths diverged. Ribot went on to play for Tom Waits, Elvis Costello, Caetano Veloso, and others, in a wide-ranging career that has touched on jazz, classical, off-kilter Americana, and punk. In the late 1960s, Casseus returned to the transcendent work he had done in the 1950s with vocalists Barbara Perlow (Haitiana) and Lolita Cuevas (Haitian Folksongs), and he began composing again for voice and guitar.
Unfortunately, Casseus’ health deteriorated throughout the 1970s. “H developed a tendon problem,” Ribot says. “He got surgery to try to correct it, but I suspect it made it worse. You can already hear it in (his playing on) the Haitiana record. It was the beginning of what was to become a struggle. Frantz continued to practice even when he couldn’t play anymore. He was playing in the hopes that (his dexterity) would return. It didn’t.”
To make matters worse, a series of strokes and heart attacks left Casseus increasingly debilitated in the ensuing years. In addition, Cassus’ recordings went out of print as his record company, Folkways, fell into disorganization in the wake of label-founder Moses Asch’s death. “Frantz’s records were unavailable and he was unable to re-record them,” Ribot says.
In an effort to keep Casseus’ work in print, Ribot, who already knew part of Casseus’ solo classical output for guitar, learned the rest of the repertoire and released Solo Guitar Works of Frantz Casseus on Les Disques du Crepuscule in 1992.
It was only a brief rallying point for Casseus, who passed away in 1993. Yet before Casseus died, Ribot promised his mentor that he would look after his life’s work. Ribot inherited the publishing rights to Casseus’ repertoire, which is currently controlled by Haitiana Music company, founded by Ribot and his family.

Ribot Marc sur Frantz Casseus (Bomb 82)When the disastrous earthquake struck Haiti, claiming at least 230,000 lives, Ribot was galvanized. “I had inherited Frantz’s publishing because he wanted me to keep his work in print,” Ribot says. “I was the person he knew who was in music and was able to make that happen. Beyond that, I never felt like “this is my money”.
“The 2010 earthquake was definitely a catalyst. It seemed crazy that I was sitting on all the money while people were starving.”
Ribot decided to honor his mentor by using Casseus’ royalties to establish a program to teach young Haitian musicians to play guitar, but he was uncertain how to proceed. Enter Pascale Jaunay. Born in France, Haitain resident Jaunay runs Caracoli, an agency that manages several Haitian ensembles and promotes Haitian music internationally. In April 2011, Jaunay attended the Tribeca Film Festival in New York. While in town, she met Ribot.
Marc told me the idea of the Young Guitarist Program,” Jaunay says. “We discussed how to implement it in Haiti.”
“Pascale’s been hugely helpful in making the connections,” Ribot says. “She has an encyclopedic knowledge of what is going on musically and culturally in haiti.”
Jaunay worked her contacts, and the pieces of the Frantz Casseus Young Guitarists Program began to fall into place. First, the Haitiana Music Company formed a partnership with the Sainte Trinité School of Music in Port-au-Prince.
“We needed someone on the ground,” Ribot says. “Rather than try to start from scratch, we built on what was there. The school administers the program which provides two teachers for classes of 15 students each.”
The school provides the venue and the administration,” Jaunay adds. “Haitiana funds the classes – equipment and teachers’ salaries – while Caracoli is responsible for coordinatif and monitoring the program. The students are mostly from (low-income) neighborhoods. Being able to learn music – to have a place to go to escape from everyday troubles – is a fairly unique opportunity for them. It allows them to glimpse new horizons – and develop their creativity in a peaceful place where they are always welcome.”
“I went down to visit the program last December, and it was wonderful,” Ribot recalls. “There’s a practice building where kids were doing sectional rehearsals with every instrument in every room. The guitar classes took place outdoors next to that building. About 40 feet from the guitar classes, the French horn section was rehearsing. It was a fantastic cacophony, but the kids were great and very dedicated and doing what they could under difficult circumstances.”
However, the school still needs more ressources and supplies, Ribot adds, noting that students must double up on guitars and that instruments cannot be taken home to neighborhoods where they may be damaged or stolen.
Marc Ribot et les élèves de Ste Trinité“The program is funded for the next three years,” Jaunay says, “but we need financing for the following years, plus a possible expansion of the program.” The program also needs more and better equipment for students, “who ideally could have their own guitars.”
All that said, Ribot notes that “the program is moving forward, and it was really inspiring to see it.”
Both Ribot and Jaunay acknoledge that there is hard word ahead for the Frantz Casseus Young Guitarists Program, but Ribot suggests that Casseus would probably have it no other way. “His dream was to bring a classical-guitar music based on Haitian folk influences to the internationale stage. He gave up a lot in order to come to New York and to do that.
“It was not easy to be a black foreinger living in the 1950s in the United States. He described touring in the South States. He described touring in the South with Harry Belafonte. They had to enter through the kitcken entrances of the hotels where they performef, and I’m sure that was the least of it. But he was able to bear a lot with grace and humor because he was doing what he loved.”
For Ribot, it’s fitting that Casseus’ generosity of spirit extends to the program that bears his name and has taken root int the home town.
“The program is intended not only to honor Frantz,” Ribot says, “but to create the conditions in which the musical tradition he founded – the fusion of folklore and classical – can he heard, played, and sustained in Haiti.”
C.M.

Tambours Croisés, programme détaillé : samedi 9 mai

TAMBOURS CROISES
Programme détaillé
Samedi 9 mai

logo tousL’activité prévue au Convention Center de Jacmel a été remplacée par un atelier au Théâtre National.
L’atelier présente les différents patrimoines musicaux des six territoires impliqués dans le projet. Il raconte l’histoire des tambours, leurs origines et leur mode de fabrication. Les différents rythmes et leur signification sont également évoqués. Chaque percussionniste réalise une démonstration seul et en groupe. L’atelier se clôt par un moment de pratique et d’échange avec le public.

Le projet Tambours Croisés en Haïti bénéficie du soutien du Ministère de la Culture et du Bureau National d’Ethnologie, de l’UNESCO, de l’Ambassade de Suisse en Haïti, de l’Institut Français en Haïti, et de la Fondation Connaissance et Liberté, et de la collaboration du Centre Culturel Pyepoudre, de la Fondation Culture Création, du Groupe d’Action et de Réflexion pour l’Education (GRACE/CAR) et du Collège Côte-Plage, de l’école de musique Sainte Trinité, de Ayiti Mizik / Kay Mizik la.

Tambours Croisés en Haiti, programme détaillé : vendredi 8 mai

TAMBOURS CROISES
Programme détaillé
Vendredi 8 mai

Tinonm small10ham : Rencontre avec Racine Mapou à Kay Mizik La / entrée libre
Kay Mizik La : 35, ruelle Roy (PAP) – tel : 2813-1143
Fondé en 1994, le groupe « Racine Mapou » du chanteur et percussionniste Azor a choisi de porter sur scène la musique traditionnelle haïtienne, en particulier les rythmes issus du répertoire vodou, encore souvent marginalisés en Haïti. Tout en maintenant le contact authentique avec la tradition et l’univers vodou, Azor et ses accompagnateurs percussionnistes – tambours et tambourins – et choristes-danseuses, ont fait le pari du professionnalisme, qui les ont menés sur les scènes du monde entier depuis plus de vingt ans …

 

2hpm : Projection « Haiti cœur battant » à Kay Mizik La / membres AM-KML
Kay Mizik La : 35, ruelle Roy (PAP) – tel : 2813-1143
Azor« Haiti, cœur battant » de Carl Lafontant avec Lenord Fortuné « Azor », Michiko Tatsuno, et Sheila Tanisma (62 min.)
Avec l’aimable autorisation des Productions Fanal et de Marcel Duret
« Un film qui propose une lecture de la culture haïtienne à partir de l’expérience vécue d’une musicienne japonaise, lors de ses multiples rencontres avec la musique traditionnelle et la culture haïtienne.
Michiko est une pianiste de jazz sur laquelle la musique d’Azor exerce une profonde fascination. Sans renier sa propre culture, elle est inexorablement amenée à entreprendre une quête musicale qui la conduira au cœur même de la culture et de la musique traditionnelle haïtienne. »
http://www.profanal.com/realisations/haiti-coeur-battant/

6hpm : Concert Tambours Croisés et invités à la FOKAL entrée libre (ticket à retirer)
FOKAL : 143, avenue Christophe (PAP) – tel : 2813-1694

Concert "Nuit des tambours" à la FOKAL. Les artistes de Tambours Croisés et leur trois invités, Bwagri, Kenbyesou, Jérome Siméon. © Steevens Siméon

Posted by CARACOLI on jeudi 14 mai 2015

logo tousLe projet Tambours Croisés en Haïti bénéficie du soutien du Ministère de la Culture et du Bureau National d’Ethnologie, de l’UNESCO, de l’Ambassade de Suisse en Haïti, de l’Institut Français en Haïti, et de la Fondation Connaissance et Liberté, et de la collaboration du Centre Culturel Pyepoudre, de la Fondation Culture Création, du Groupe d’Action et de Réflexion pour l’Education (GRACE/CAR) et du Collège Côte-Plage, de l’école de musique Sainte Trinité, de Ayiti Mizik / Kay Mizik la.

Tambours Croisés, programme détaillé : jeudi 7 mai

TAMBOURS CROISES
Programme détaillé
Jeudi 7 mai

7hpm : Concert Tambours Croisés à l’Institut Français en Haïti / entrée libre
Institut Français en Haiti : 99, avenue Lamartinière (PAP) – tel : 3161-454

Sur scène, les concerts réunissent douze chanteurs et percussionnistes porteurs des traditions musicales des six territoires impliqués dans le projet. Ensemble, ils opèrent une fusion des rythmes et des voix intégrant les patrimoines musicaux très différents des Caraïbes et de l’Océan Indien. Les traditions de chacun sont donc représentées, mais elles fusionnent pour créer un nouveau répertoire et découvrir de nouveaux horizons avec pour seule instrumentation la voix et le tambour.

LES ARTISTES DE « TAMBOURS CROISES »

fotGuyane : Mc-Lilee chant et Christopher Clet tambours.
Si la tradition réunit ces deux artistes, le mode d’expression est très différent ; Mc Lile, rappe, slame et cote. La fusion avec le tambour s’opère parfaitement et ses textes sont souvent d’actualité comme l‘étaient ceux des chants d’esclaves dans les champs de canne à sucre. Le quotidien alimente les textes sur des rythmes définitivement traditionnels. D’où la présence de Christopher Clet à ses côtés. Il est considéré comme l’un des meilleurs joueurs de tambours de la Guyane à tout juste 21 ans. Les artistes guyanais n’hésitent pas à faire appel à son talent de tambouyé mais aussi de compositeur. Parmi eux, Silo; Denis Lapassion, Nadine Léo, Lova JAH…

Guadeloupe : Marie-Line Dahomay chant, et Joël Jean tambours.
Marie-Line a attendu deux ans pour intégrer le groupe qu’elle avait vu lors de la deuxième tournée. Son arrivée est une ouverture à d’autres influences même si sa base est définitivement traditionnelle. Mais avec Marie-Line le chant est à la limite du lyrique et du jazz ce qui lui permet de participer à de nombreux projets transversaux. Joël Jean, multi-percussionniste et homme de culture, a participé à de nombreux albums dont ceux de Guy Konkett, Gérard Pomer, Kafé, Ti Céleste, Cosaque, Van Lévé. Il a aussi fait partie de plusieurs groupes: Gwo Kato avec Gérard Pomer, Trio Ka. Depuis 2002, il participe régulièrement au festival de Gwo ka de Sainte-Anne en Guadeloupe.

Haiti : Jackson Saintil tambours, Guerline Pierre chant
Jackson Saintil a commencé à jouer du tambour dans les cérémonies vodou dès l’âge de 5 ans. Depuis de nombreuses années, il fait maintenant partie des rares percussionnistes qui peuvent vivre du tambour, à la fois comme musicien et professeur. Il est notamment responsable des tambours d’Ayikodans, compagnie de danse de renommée internationale, depuis 2000. Il enseigne également le tambour aux enfants de l’Orphelinat des Petits Frères et Soeurs depuis plus de vingt ans. Il a collaboré avec de nombreux artistes haïtiens, tels que Emeline Michel, Luck Mervil, Fabienne Denis ou encore RAM. De son côté, la chanteuse Guerline Pierre a aussi collaboré avec la compagnie Ayikodans et des artistes de renom, parmi lesquels le groupe de mizik rasin, « Racine Mapou de Azor ».

NenettoMartinique : Nenetto chant, Claude Jean-Joseph tambours.
A 53 ans, René Capitaine, dit Nenetto est l’une des rares femmes à chanter du bèlè. Elle a participé aux albums de Willy Léger, Christian Cronard, Gilles Voyer et Tony Chasseur et a été appelée à faire « lavwa dèyè » sur le dernier album des Maîtres du Bèlè. Véritable boule d’énergie, elle chante en dansant avec une générosité communicative. Tambours Croisés a participé à la reconnaissance de la voix la plus marquante de ces dernières années.
Claude Jean-Joseph, « petit nouveau » dans le projet, est considéré au pays comme le grand espoir du tambour martiniquais. Génération oblige, il n’hésite pas à s’initier à d’autres disciplines.

Mayotte : Diho chant,
À l’école de musique de Mamoudzou, Diho transmet son savoir concernant les instruments traditionnels mahorais. A 50 ans, il est une référence en matière de chants et d’instruments des musiques traditionnelles mahoraises telles le Biaya, le Chacacha, le Chigoma et le Mgodro. Son parcours est riche de rencontres auxquelles il participe activement dans les années 90 pendant lesquelles il joue avec les meilleurs musiciens africains du moment.

Réunion : Eno chant, Zelito Deliron tambours.
Eno est l‘une des figures emblématiques du maloya. Il est né et a grandi dans le maloya et le “kabaré”. Avant de mener une carrière solo, il a chanté avec les plus grands. Il est d’autant plus demandé qu’il mane aussi bien les percus réunioonnaises que le chant et ce en n’hésitant pas à s’ouvrir à d’autres mouvements musicaux. Zelito Deliron, plus connu sous le pseudo de Toto, est un passionné de musiques du monde et de jazz. Joueur de tambours et de percus reconnu, il chante et joue aussi de la flûte, ce qui fait de lui l’un des musiciens les plus actifs de la Réunion

Concert à L'Institut Français en Haïti. © Steevens Siméon

Posted by CARACOLI on jeudi 14 mai 2015

logo tousLe projet Tambours Croisés en Haïti bénéficie du soutien du Ministère de la Culture et du Bureau National d’Ethnologie, de l’UNESCO, de l’Ambassade de Suisse en Haïti, de l’Institut Français en Haïti, et de la Fondation Connaissance et Liberté, et de la collaboration du Centre Culturel Pyepoudre, de la Fondation Culture Création, du Groupe d’Action et de Réflexion pour l’Education (GRACE/CAR) et du Collège Côte-Plage, de l’école de musique Sainte Trinité, de Ayiti Mizik / Kay Mizik la.

Tambours Croisés, programme détaillé : mercredi 6 mai

TAMBOURS CROISES EN HAITI
Programme détaillé
Mercredi 6 mai

10ham-4hpm : Atelier au Bureau National d’Ethnologie
Champs de Mars

Ateliers au Bureau National d'Ethnologie avec les élèves de l'École Nationale de la République du Chili + quelque tambourineurs haïtiens. © Steevens Siméon.

Posted by CARACOLI on jeudi 14 mai 2015

Thierry Nossin2hpm : Rencontre avec Thierry Nossin à Kay Mizik La / entrée libre
Kay Mizik La : 35, ruelle Roy (PAP) – tel : 2813-1143
« L’adaptation des musiques traditionnelles à la scène »
Producteur de « Tambours Croisés », créateur et coordinateur du projet, Thierry Nossin abordera la thématique de l’adaptation des musiques traditionnelles à la scène face aux exigences du circuit professionnel de la musique du monde.

Thierry Nossin officie depuis 37 ans à la reconnaissance des musiques du monde. Producteur d’artistes et d’événements (plus de 450 dont 3 festivals), il a, entre autres, participé à l’encadrement de la Maison du Bèlè de la Martinique de 2003 à 2008 et a codirigé le festival Bèlè Mundo. Il a organisé les rencontres des Maîtres du Bèlè avec des artistes du Brésil, d’Argentine, du Venezuela, du Sénégal, du Congo, d’Inde. Il a contribué, dès la fin des années 70, à la reconnaissance des musiques antillaises en organisant le premier festival de musiques du monde avec des groupes peu connus alors, dont Malavoi, Kassav’, Joby Bernabé, Fal Frett, Max Cilla, Elie Pennont, Dédé Saint Prix, Guy Konket. Il est l’un des pionniers de la world music. Par ailleurs, il enseigne la production artistique dans plusieurs centres de formation professionnelle en France dont Issoudun, l’IESA, etc.

6hpm : Conférence de Dominique Cyrille à l’Institut Français / entrée libre
Institut Français en Haiti : 99, avenue Lamartinière (PAP) – tel : 3161-4545
Tambours Croisés, programme détaillé : mardi 5 mai« Musiques de Guadeloupe, patrimoine et diversité » par Dominique Cyrille, précédée d’une intervention de Tatiana Villegas, spécialiste culture à l’UNESCO sur la Convention de 2005 sur la promotion et la protection de la diversité des expressions culturelles

gwokaParis, 26 Novembre 2014, une pratique de musique et de danse guadeloupéenne, le gwoka, est inscrite sur la liste représentative du Patrimoine Culturel Immatériel de l’Humanité avec un dossier déclaré exemplaire. La conférence de Dominique Cyrille, responsable de la mission patrimoine au Centre Rèpriz, se penche sur certains aspects du processus qui a abouti à cette inscription. En revenant sur quelques éléments qui ont fait du dossier du gwoka un des meilleurs de sa session, Dominique Cyrille met en lumière les aspects du discours que les Guadeloupéens ont développé autour du gwoka au cours du vingtième siècle. En outre, bien que selon les membres du Lyannaj pou gwoka, « l’inscription fera savoir au monde que Guadeloupe = Gwoka », cette expression culturelle n’est pas la seule qui, en Guadeloupe, peut répondre aux critères d’inscription sur la liste représentative. Dominique Cyrille propose aussi de mettre en avant quelques pratiques de musique et de danse dans lesquels de nombreux Guadeloupéens se reconnaissent et qui favorisent déjà les échanges que la Guadeloupe a entamés avec d’autres pays et notamment avec les pays de l’archipel Caraïbe.

Dominique Cyrille est l’auteur d’une thèse de Musicologie soutenue à Paris-IV, Paris-Sorbonne en 1996 et relative à la contribution africaine dans la musique rurale de la Martinique. Chargée d’Enseignement puis Maître Assistant à Lehman College/CUNY (City University of New York) de 1999 à 2008, parmi ses écrits figurent des chapitres de livres, des monographies et plusieurs livrets accompagnateurs de CD dont deux de la collection Alan Lomax: The 1962 Caribbean Voyage. Ses principaux articles ont été publiés dans Black Music Research Journal, Latin American Music Review, Dance Research Journal, dans les encyclopédies Encyclopedia of Popular Musics of the World (EPMOW), Music in Latin America and the Caribbean.
Ses travaux récents sur les quadrilles créoles des petites Antilles sont présentés dans The Contradanza and Quadrille Complex: Crucible of Caribbean Experience édité par Peter Manuel et dans Alarèpriz, une étude des quadrilles de Guadeloupe, un ouvrage de vulgarisation élaboré par le centre Rèpriz. En 2003, 2005 et 2007, Dominique Cyrille a organisé le Séminaire d’Ethnomusicologie Caribéenne pour le compte de la Médiathèque Caraïbe (LAMECA) et du Festival de Gwoka de Sainte-Anne.
Arrivée en Guadeloupe en Septembre 2008 pour contribuer à la structuration de la mission patrimoine du centre Rèpriz, elle en est devenue depuis Responsable. A ce titre, elle participe à l’effort de documentation et de promotion des musiques et danses du patrimoine culturel immatériel de Guadeloupe, mais c’est en chercheur indépendant qu’elle poursuit ses travaux sur les musiques et danses de la zone géoculturelle caribéenne.
(crédits photo : Laurent de Bompuis)

logo tousLe projet Tambours Croisés en Haïti bénéficie du soutien du Ministère de la Culture et du Bureau National d’Ethnologie, de l’UNESCO, de l’Ambassade de Suisse en Haïti, de l’Institut Français en Haïti, et de la Fondation Connaissance et Liberté, et de la collaboration du Centre Culturel Pyepoudre, de la Fondation Culture Création, du Groupe d’Action et de Réflexion pour l’Education (GRACE/CAR) et du Collège Côte-Plage, de l’école de musique Sainte Trinité, de Ayiti Mizik / Kay Mizik la.

Tambours Croisés, programme détaillé : mardi 5 mai

TAMBOURS CROISES EN HAITI
Programme détaillé
Mardi 5 mai

12hpm-4hpm : Atelier Tambours Croisés au Collège de Côte-plage
rue Tovar, Côte-Plage 18

Rythme et tambour2hpm : Projection de « Rythme et Tambour / 1ère partie » à la FOKAL / entrée libre – FOKAL : 143, avenue Christophe (PAP) – tel : 2813-1694
« Rythme & tambour / 1ère partie » de Patrick Denis d’après les recherches de Dany Danache avec Grégoire Dienguele Matsoua (39 min.)
« Le rythme occupe une place importante dans la culture négro-africaine et d’aucuns prétendent même que c’est au son du tambour que l’on reconnaît l’Haïtien. Cette boutade veut elle souligner la place prépondérante du rythme dans tous les aspects de la vie nationale … »
La séance sera présentée par Kesler Bien-Aimé, sociologue, spécialiste de programme culture à la commission nationale haitienne de coopération avec l’UNESCO, professeur d’histoire de la photographie et du cinéma, UEH; en présence de Grégoire Dienguele Matsoua

6hpm : Soirée Culturelle au Centre Culturel Pyepoudre / entrée libre
Centre culturel Pyepopudre : 312, Route de Bourdon (PAP) – tel : 3812-1813
Le Centre culturel Pyepoudre accueille toute l’équipe de Tambours Croisés pour une soirée culturelle autour du tambour : exposition, conte, lecture et autres activités pour mettre la musique traditionnelle à l’honneur.
Harold et Adjasou accueilleront les invités au tambour. Béo et Jacky diront des textes slam. Les danseurs de Haïti Tchaka Danse feront une courte démonstration suivie du conte « Paroles tambours » par Pyepoudre. La soirée se terminera avec l’animation de la bande à pied Follow Jah.

Soirée culturelle au Centre Culturel Pyepoudre – © Steevens siméon

Posted by CARACOLI on jeudi 14 mai 2015

logo tousLe projet Tambours Croisés en Haïti bénéficie du soutien du Ministère de la Culture et du Bureau National d’Ethnologie, de l’UNESCO, de l’Ambassade de Suisse en Haïti, de l’Institut Français en Haïti, et de la Fondation Connaissance et Liberté, et de la collaboration du Centre Culturel Pyepoudre, de la Fondation Culture Création, du Groupe d’Action et de Réflexion pour l’Education (GRACE/CAR) et du Collège Côte-Plage, de l’école de musique Sainte Trinité, de Ayiti Mizik / Kay Mizik la.